Posts in category Women Peace & Security

How to Deal With the R...

How to Deal With the Risk of Rape and Sexual Assault When Doing Fieldwork?

By Alicia Luedke The incident at Terrain Hotel in the capital of South Sudan, Juba in July of this year, in which a number of aid workers were raped by government soldiers highlighted the risks that aid workers, particularly female aid workers face in high-risk areas. This is by no means intended to overshadow the horrific […]

Where is the Will to I...

Where is the Will to Implement UNSCR 1325?

By: Clara Fisher, Paige Harland, Kat Ilich, and Erin McGown In October 2000, after years of lobbying by women’s rights activists, the UN Security Council passed Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security (WPS). UNSCR 1325 brought the WPS agenda to the UN system’s attention for the first time, calling on all actors to take women’s […]

Leveraging the Women, ...

Leveraging the Women, Peace and Security Plan

by Anna Powles and Jacqui True Anna Powles and Jacqui True analyze New Zealand’s draft National Action Plan for the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security. They take a deeper look at the five focus areas of the National Action Plan: (1) ensuring women’s involvement in decision-making within conflict and post-conflict […]

The Missing Link: Gend...

The Missing Link: Gender and the 2015 UN Peacekeeping Review

  by Gabe Dayley Last September, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon established a High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations to undertake a comprehensive review of UN peacekeeping and political missions. The review is both timely and much needed, given that 15 years has passed since Lakhdar Brahimi conducted the last major review of UN […]

Women Could Bridge the...

Women Could Bridge the Silicon Valley/DC Divide in Cybersecurity

by Andrea Little Limbago Photo: Philip Jean-Pierre, Endgame As the government shutdown loomed large in 2013, Senator Susan Collins, a Republican, introduced a budget plan that she believed would garner bi-partisan support. Within a few days, two other female Republican Senators signed on, as did two female Democratic Senators. Eventually, the bipartisan group reached 13 members, […]

A Snapshot: Two Years ...

A Snapshot: Two Years into Combat Integration

By Ellen Haring January 30, 2015 U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno speaks with a female Soldier at the Army Ranger Training Brigade, Ranger Assessment Course during his visit to Fort Benning, Ga., Oct. 23, 2014. Gen. Odierno was visiting to discuss the progress of integrating women into the Ranger School Course. Female […]

If or How will the US ...

If or How will the US Marine Corps Fully Integrate?

By Ellen Haring December 5, 2014 Pfc. Julia Carroll eats a small meal after a six-hour patrol during patrol week of Infantry Training Battalion near Camp Geiger, N.C. on Oct. 31, 2013. Carroll is one of the first three females to ever graduate from Infantry Training Battalion. Patrol week is a five-day training event that […]

With Outrage, the Valu...

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by Sahana Dharmapuri The recent beheadings of U.S. journalists Steven Satloff and James Foley, as well as British aid worker David Haines by ISIS are a gruesome and tragic reminder of our relationship with extremists since 9/11. So far, public debate has focused on the motivations for this kind of extreme political violence and what […]

Kathleen Kuehnast on D...

Kuehnast UN Panel

On September 9, 2014, Dr. Kathleen Kuehnast participated in a panel regarding “The Role and Contributions of Women and Youth to the Culture of Peace” at a UN High Level Forum on the Culture of Peace. She is both a valued member of WIIS and the director of USIP’s Center for Gender and Peacebuilding. In addressing her fellow panelists and the larger audience, Kuehnast asserts that “a culture of peace needs dynamic and creative leadership, an inclusive approach that does not ‘instrumentalize’ women or children, and a well-funded effort.”

Mr. Cameron: why not q...

In UK politics women parliamentarians are still underrepresented at all decision-making levels. But this can easily be altered with the implementation of a quota of 40% female candidates for all major Westminster parties – which would significantly alter the culture of Westminster in the space of just one or two elections. And without a more representative parliament and government, how can the UK expect its advocacy of gender equality and women’s empowerment to be taken seriously by the rest of the world?

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