Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Digital Technologies, Peacebuilding and Civil Society

Julia Hofstetter

04/22/2021

Topics:
  • Women Peace and Security
  • Conflict
  • Peacebuilding
Summary:

The wide availability of digital technologies is increasingly impacting the work of peacebuilders, altering both peacebuilding practices and conflict dynamics. The malicious use of technology – from the weaponization of social media to digital authoritarianism and cyberattacks – poses new threats to peaceful societies and urges peacebuilders to consider new fields of action in cyberspace. However, digitalization has also brought major innovations to the work of peacebuilders, establishing a new field of practice, ‘digital peacebuilding’. Many of the innovative uses of peace technologies – for conflict prevention, transformation and reconciliation – have been driven by civil society organizations, who are at the forefront of addressing the rising threat of digital conflict drivers, too. This report provides an overview of the opportunities and challenges digital technologies create for peacebuilders, discusses how they alter the role of civil society, and proposes future directions for the digital peacebuilding agenda.

Women, Peace and… Continued Militarism? Revisiting UNSCR 1325 and Its African Roots

Nico Edwards

01/12/2021

Topics:
  • Gender
  • Women Peace and Security
  • Feminist Theory
  • Security Studies
  • Peacebuilding
  • Africa
Summary:

Twenty years on the Women, Peace and Security agenda, rather than constituting a forceful adversary, more than ever faces the risk of becoming a pawn in the patriarchal and militarist governance of peacebuilding and security politics. It is high time to revisit the grassroots voices of the Global South who made the agenda possible, as they lay bare the Resolution's hijacking by liberal-feminist tropes and the 'malestream' practices against which UNSCR 1325 fends for its existence.

Raped to the Grave

Simon Teryila Zaki

03/02/2021

Topics:
  • Women Peace and Security
Summary:

Raped to the Grave is a tragic story that explores the sour relationship between farmers and herdsmen fuelled by their greedy, insatiable leaders with potbellies and kleptomaniac fingers whose only aim is to feast on the collective sweat of the poor masses who wallow in abject poverty and are left defenceless to be preyed upon by wild beasts while they (leaders) bask in the euphoria of abundant wealth and dwell in formidable high walls.The story told through the intricately woven experiences of Terseer, Tyopenda and Dooshima, enquires into the theme of man's savagery in the absence of competent government authority to regulate and defend the defenceless of the society as shown in the ruthless butcher of Terseer and his wife Nguemo into bits, and the eventual cleansing of the entire village in the dread of the night. This regrettably sad reality was beforehand captured by Thomas Hobbes in his work Leviathan where he stated that outside the society (society meaning an organised system where the people are under a competent government authority), life would be 'solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short'. The story ends with a tone of uncertainty about what the future holds especially for children who are victims of wars and human wickedness in a society where the so-called leaders are carefree about the people entrusted into their care to govern.

THE URGENT NEED TO REVIEW SECURITY TECHNOLOGY We need an IRB for security and criminal justice technology in the United States.

Ryan Mason

03/18/2021

Summary:

What is needed to create more transparency when it comes to purchasing and using security and criminal justice technology? How can their acquisition be done in a way that is compatible with the right to privacy?

The Sum of All Friends: Improving Cross-border Intelligence Sharing in Europe - the Case of the Benelux

Agnes Venema

05/27/2020

Topics:
  • General International Relations
  • Security Studies
  • Terrorism
  • European Union
Summary:

In battling organized crime and terrorism, the sharing of intelligence is of crucial importance. This is especially true in Europe, where suspects can easily travel between the different ‘Schengen’ jurisdictions, which allows free movement of persons. It is crucial for EU member states to pool resources and share intelligence if they want to gain the upper hand in crime-fighting and counter-terrorism operations.

Due to the highly sensitive nature of intelligence and the fact that being secretive is a tool of the trade, sharing does not come naturally to policing and intelligence agencies, especially not with foreign partners. However, there is a need to re-envision the relationships of these agencies with their foreign counterparts vis-à-vis intelligence sharing. This article will shed light on how cross-border intelligence sharing is currently undertaken by focusing on international police cooperation in the EU. By identifying the practices that have shaped the 2018 Benelux police cooperation treaty, this article will demonstrate how the EU can strengthen its intelligence-sharing mechanisms. In doing so, it aims to highlight the obstacles to overcome in order to level the playing field between criminals and terrorists on the one hand and policing and intelligence agencies on the other.

A credible and accountable EU foreign service? Not yet

Corinna Horst

03/11/2020